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Hydrogeology Contacts

Marlon Cook

205.247.3692

What's Wet - Hydrogeology

 

Drilling rig at the Ozark Utilities Tuscaloosa Group aquifer test in Dale County, Alabama

 

Ozark Utilities recently contracted the construction of a well to test water availability of the Tuscaloosa Group near the city of Ozark. Data used to drill the well came from a Geological Survey of Alabama hydrogeologic and geochemical assessment of the Tuscaloosa Group aquifer. The test well is producing abundant, excellent-quality water from a depth of 2, 750 feet, making it the deepest public water supply well in Alabama.

 

 

Real-time ground-water-level monitoring equipment at a well in Lawrence County, Alabama

 

The United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Geological Survey of Alabama and other state agencies recently initiated a real-time ground-water-level monitoring system for Alabama. The data from this system may be used to evaluate drought and to monitor conditions in aquifer recharge areas. Data from the ground-water-level monitoring initiative may be viewed at: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/al/nwis/current/?type=gw&group_key=NONE

 

 

 

 

 

Floodway under construction in the city of Elba, southeast Alabama.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Floodway Construction in Elba, Coffee County, Alabama

Findings and recommendations from a flood assessment performed by the Geological Survey of Alabama were used by the US Army Corps of Engineers to design and construct a floodway in the city of Elba in southeast Alabama. Local, county, and state officials joined with the GSA and Corps of Engineers to make the project a reality.


The GSA study concluded that much of the historic flooding of the city was caused by storm-water runoff trapped inside the Elba levee when the Pea River is above flood stage. The floodway utilizes an existing abandoned creek channel and floodplain inside the city to store and transport floodwater to an area where it can be pumped out of the city, over the levee, and into the Pea River. The conversion of this blighted area into a floodway will create green space that can be used for recreation during most of the year.